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ARCHIVED WINTER ARTICLES

Winter in Wisconsin can be fun and excitiing. Driving in or after an ice storm may be dangerous. Follow these tips and suggestions to keep you and your family safe this winter.

For a list of all archived articles visit our Archived Articles List.

 



brown bulletpointArchived Winter Safety Articles

 

 

COLD WEATHER TIPS

Protect Yourself

  • Dress in several layers of lightweight clothing, which will keep you warmer than a single heavy coat.
  • Mittens provide more warmth to your hands than gloves. Wear a hat, preferably one that covers your ears.
  • Wear waterproof, insulated boots to keep your feet warm and dry and to maintain your footing in ice and snow.
  • Take frequent breaks and stay hydrated.
  • Seek medical attention immediately if you have symptoms of hypothermia including confusion, dizziness, exhaustion and severe shivering.
  • Seek medical attention immediately if you have symptoms of frostbite including numbness, flushed gray, white, blue or yellow skin discoloration, numbness, or waxy feeling skin.

Protect Yourself at Home

  • Be careful with candles – do not use candles for lighting if the power goes out. Use flashlights only.
  • Inspect fireplaces and wood stoves yearly - use a sturdy fire screen with lit fires. Burn only wood - never burn paper or pine boughs.
  • Use generators correctly –never operate a generator inside your home, including the basement or garage. Do not hook up a generator directly to your home's wiring. The safest thing to do is to connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator.
  • Prevent frozen pipes - when the weather is very cold outside, open cabinet doors to let warm air circulate around water pipes. Let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe - even at a trickle - helps prevent pipes from freezing because the temperature of the water running through it is above freezing. Keep the thermostat set to a consistent temperature.
  • Check smoke alarms once a month by pressing the test button and replace batteries as necessary.
  • Don’t overload your electrical outlets.
  • Don’t forget your pets – bring them indoors. If you can’t bring them inside, provide adequate shelter to keep them warm and make sure they can get to unfrozen water.
  • If you plan on using an alternate heating source, never use a stove or oven to heat your home.
  • Keep a glass or metal fire screen around the fireplace and never leave a fireplace fire unattended.
  • If using a space heater, follow the manufacturer’s instructions on how to safely use the heater. Place it on a level, hard, nonflammable surface. Turn the space heater off when you leave the room or go to sleep. Keep children and pets away from your space heater and do not use it to dry wet clothing

Article from: Oregon Red Cross

http://www.redcross.org/news/article/Winter-Weather-Safety-Tips

 

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HOW TO HANDLE BLACK ICE

Black ice can be one of the most dangerous conditions on winter roads. It is almost invisible and can catch drivers off guard.  Black ice is clear and appears black because the dark asphalt surface underneath shows through. It can form on heavily congested highways from auto emissions, but other roads are susceptible including those in shaded areas, near lakes and rivers, in tunnels and on overpasses.
Drivers can increase safety by observing the following tips:

  • Be aware that black ice is almost invisible.
  • Be especially careful on bridges, overpasses and tunnels and in early morning when the air temperature is rising faster than the pavement temperature.
  • Never brake while driving on ice. Applying pressure to your brakes while on ice will cause a vehicle to skid. Brake only during your approach.
  • Keep your distance. The distance needed to stop on ice is twice as long as under normal driving circumstances. Keep at least a three-car distance from the vehicle directly in front of you.

Black ice is neutralized with salting and sanding. However, drivers should be aware that salt loses its effectiveness at about 15 degrees and colder. In temperatures below 15 degrees, WI/DOT uses either sand or de-icing liquids that are effective at lower temperatures.

Travelers in WI can get up-to-date information on road conditions, construction and weather reports from WI/DOT's 511 traveler information service. By phone, dial 511 or on the Internet at  http://www.511wi.gov/Web/

Article by: http://www.dot.state.mn.us/newsrels/03/01/21blackice.html

 

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ICE DAMS & ATTIC CONDENSATION

While stopping a leak or repairing a hose down in the basement might be fairly straightforward, ice dams and attic condensation, two forms of water damage typical to cold climate homes, are a little more complicated and a little trickier to fix. And since many homeowners aren't frequent visitors to their own attics in the frigid winter months, water damage on the top floor might catch you off guard.

What are ice dams? What causes attic condensation? And if you’ve got either, what can you do?

Ice Dams
When the temperature in your attic is above freezing, snow on the roof will likely melt. When the snowmelt runs down the roof and hits the colder eaves, it refreezes, especially if the temperature drops again.
If this cycle repeats over several days, the freezing snowmelt builds up and forms a dam of ice, behind which water pools up into large puddles, or "ponds". The ponding water can then back up under the roof covering and leak into the attic or along exterior walls.

The right weather conditions for ice dams are usually when outside air temperatures are in the low 20s (°F) for several days with several inches of snow on the roof.

Attic Condensation
Condensation of water vapor on cold surfaces in attics can cause wood to rot, which can lead to costly repairs. Condensation typically occurs when warm, moist air migrates into the attic from living spaces below. Research indicates unusually high humidity in the home's living spaces is strongly associated with attic condensation problems.

Prevention
Building codes have some requirements that attempt to prevent the problems of ice dams and attic condensation. But codes don’t address all the issues, and many houses are built without following building codes. First and foremost, it’s your builder or designer's job to understand the relationship of humidity and air movement when designing and constructing the house so these problems don't occur.
Nevertheless, there's more you can do. Here are a few simple steps that can help prevent ice dams and condensation in your attic:

  • Prevent warm, moist downstairs air from infiltrating the attic by appropriately insulating your attic’s floor and using a dehumidifier to control water vapor.
  • Seal all openings that would allow vapor to rise into the attic. Avoid designing ceiling mounted fixtures below the attic that create the need for holes in the drywall or plaster ceiling. If this cannot be done, seal around all penetrations to make them airtight. Ceiling-mounted light fixtures and ceiling fans have electrical junction boxes mounted flush in the ceiling – these often have a number of holes in them that need to be sealed.
  • Research shows keeping the attic air temperature below freezing when the outside air temperature is in the low 20s can reduce the occurrence of ice dams.
  • Provide good attic ventilation to replace warm air in the attic with cold outside air.
  • Consult a professional for the best way to avoid ice dams and water damage in your home.

What Not To Do
While it might be tempting to try a quick-fix to break up that ice dam, don’t get too eager; not only is it dangerous on your roof, but you can also cause a lot of damage, especially in the colder months. Here are some things to keep in mind:

  • Do not routinely remove snow from the roof or attempt to “chip away” the ice of an ice dam. It will likely lead to shingle damage.
  • Do not install large mechanical equipment or water heaters in attics, especially in cold climates. Not only do they present an unwelcome fire hazard, but they’ll also increase the temperature in your attic.
  • Do not use salt or calcium chloride to melt snow on a roof. These chemicals are very corrosive and can shorten the life of metal gutters, downspouts, and flashings. Runoff that contains high concentrations of these chemicals can damage nearby grass and plants.
  • Keeping the gutters clean of leaves will not necessarily prevent ice dams. However, clean gutters can help keep them from overflowing and spilling rainwater next to the house.

For more information check out this website:  http://www.preventicedams.org/

 

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ICE FISHING SAFETY TIPS

Although these tips are practical and could be life-saving, common sense is your first avenue of defense.  Don’t drive any vehicle out on the ice when it has been 40 degrees or warmer for more than 2 days! 

  • Clear, solid ice at least two inches thick is usually sufficient to hold a single person walking on foot. For safety’s sake, wait until the ice is at least three inches thick and go with a friend. Keep a least 50 feet of distance between each other. Ice fishing with several friends and gear requires at least four inches of ice, and snowmobiles and ATV’s five inches.
  • Ice will generally be thicker near shore and get thinner as one ventures out. Check ice thickness with an ice spud or auger starting from a few feet from shore and every 10 to 20 feet as one goes towards the middle of the waterway.
  • Lake ice is generally stronger than river ice. Springs, lake inlets and outlets, and channels can alter ice thickness.
  • Before heading out onto early or newly formed ice, check with a local bait shop, resort owner, or outdoors store regarding ice thickness or known thin spots.
  • Ice claws: nail heads are ground off to a point and then covered with corks to prevent injury. The cord, made to the correct length, can be worn inside the jacket with each claw inside a sleeve. Or they can be draped over the shoulder and inside the coat. The wooden dowels and nylon cord will float, so they are accessible in an emergency.
  • Whether alone or with a friend on early ice, always carry a couple of large sharpened nails and a length of rope in an easily accessible pocket. The nails or commercially bought ice grabbers can help a person pull themselves out of the water an on to more solid ice. The rope can be thrown to another person for rescue.
  • If you are alone and go through the ice, take a few seconds to get over the “cold shock.” Regain your breathing, kick hard and try to swim up onto the ice. If successful, crawl on your hands and knees or roll to more solid ice. Get to the nearest warm place quickly. If your attempts to swim onto the ice area unsuccessful, get as much of your body out of the water and yell for help. Studies show you will have about 30 minutes or more before the body is incapacitated by hypothermia.
  • Proper clothing can increase chances of survival should a person break through the ice. A snowmobile type suit if it is zipped can and will trap air and slow the body’s heat loss. Once filled with water, however, insulated suits become heavy and will hinder rescue. Newer model snowmobile suits have flotation material built in and anyone traversing ice should consider purchasing one of these suits. On early ice it is advised to wear a personal flotation device.
  • Refrain from driving on ice whenever possible. Traveling in a vehicle, especially early or late in the season, is an accident waiting to happen.
  • When driving on ice be prepared to leave the vehicle in a hurry. Unbuckle the seatbelt and have a simple plan of action in case of ice break through. Anglers may want to leave a window open for an easy exit.
  • Often vehicles will establish roads from shore to the current fishing hotspots. Repeated vehicle use may cause the ice to weaken. The ice roads may not always be the safest routes.
  • When using a gas or liquid heater to warm an ice shack or tent make sure it is properly ventilated with at least two openings, one at the top and one at the bottom of the structure. Any flame eats oxygen so proper ventilation is required.

Common sense is the greatest ally in preventing ice related accidents, and that includes checking ice conditions and preparing oneself before venturing out. Five minutes of checking ice from shore, talking to local authorities or bait shops, and systematic checks while going out on the ice can make the difference between an enjoyable winter experience and a tragedy, he says.

Article from:

http://dnr.wi.gov/news/BreakingNews_Lookup.asp?id=1936

 


ICE SAFETY TIPS-WINTER SPORTS

Each year, as the ice begins to form on lakes and ponds, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources receives hundreds of phone calls asking: "Is the ice safe yet?  Ice is NEVER safe."

Even if ice is a foot thick in one area on a lake, it can be one inch thick just a few yards away. Here are a few general guidelines for use by winter recreation enthusiasts to lessen their chances for an icy dip or worse. It’s impossible to judge the strength of ice by its appearance, thickness, daily temperature, or snow cover alone. Ice strength is actually dependent on all four factors, plus water depth under the ice, the size of the water and water chemistry, currents, and distribution of the load on the ice.

  • Wait to walk out on the ice until there are at least 4 inches of clear, solid ice. Thinner ice will support one person, but since ice thickness can vary considerably, especially at the beginning and end of the season, 4 inches will provide a margin of safety. Some factors that can change ice thickness include flocks of waterfowl and schools of fish. By congregating in a small area, fish can cause warmer water from the bottom towards the surface, weakening or in some cases opening large holes in the ice.
  • Go out with a buddy and keep a good distance apart as you walk out. If one of you goes in the other can call for help. The companion can also attempt a rescue if one of you is carrying rope or other survival gear.
  • Snowmobiles and ATV’s need at least 5 inches, and cars and light trucks need at least 8-12 inches of good clear ice.
  • Contact a local resort or bait shop for information about known thin ice areas.
  • Wear a life jacket. Life vests or float coats provide excellent flotation and protection from hypothermia. Never wear a life jacket if you are traveling in an enclosed vehicle, however. It could hamper escape in case of a breakthrough.
  • Carry a pair of homemade ice picks or even a pair of screwdrivers tied together with a few yards of strong cord that can be used to pull yourself up and onto the ice if you do fall in. Be sure they have wooden handles so if you drop them in the struggle to get out of the water, they won’t go straight to the bottom!
  • Avoid driving on the ice whenever possible. Traveling in a vehicle, especially early or late in the season is simply "an accident waiting to happen." In the number of ice fatalities occurring in Wisconsin, 68 percent involved a vehicle.
  • Be prepared to bail out in a hurry if you find it necessary to use a car, unbuckle your seatbelt and have a plan of action if you do breakthrough. Some safety experts recommend driving with the window rolled down and the doors ajar for an easy escape. Move your car frequently. Parking in one place for a long period weakens ice. Don’t park near cracks, and watch out for pressure ridges or ice heaves.
  • Don’t drive across ice at night or when it is snowing. Reduced visibility increases your chances for driving into an open or weak ice area.
  • Check at the access if there are signs that indicate an aeration system is in operation on the lake. Aerators keep areas of water open to provide oxygen for fish. The ice can be weakened many yards beyond where the ice is actually open. Stay well outside the fenced areas indicated by diamond shaped thin ice signs.

Try not to panic. Of course that’s easier said than done, but if you decide on a plan before you actually fall in, survival chances are greatly improved.


http://dnr.wi.gov/

 

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PREVENT SNOW SHOVELING & BLOWING INJURIES

Snow removal is more than just another necessary household chore. All that bending and heavy lifting can put you at serious risk for injury. Snow removal can be especially dangerous if you do not exercise regularly.
According to the 2009 US Consumer Product Safety Commission:

  • Approximately 16,500 people were treated in hospital emergency rooms for injuries that happened while shoveling or removing ice and snow manually
  • More than 6,000 people were injured using snowblowers

The most common injuries associated with snow removal include sprains and strains, particularly in the back and shoulders, as well as lacerations and finger amputations.

General Tips for Safe Snow Clearing

© 2011, Thinkstock

  • Check with your doctor. Because this activity places high stress on the heart, you should always speak with your doctor before shoveling or snow blowing. If you have a medical condition or do not exercise regularly, consider hiring someone to remove the snow.
  • Dress appropriately. Light, layered, water-repellent clothing provides both ventilation and insulation. It is also important to wear the appropriate head coverings, as well as mittens or gloves and thick, warm socks. Avoid falls by wearing shoes or boots that have slip-resistant soles.
  • Start early. Try to clear snow early and often. Begin shoveling/snowblowing when a light covering of snow is on the ground to avoid dealing with packed, heavy snow.
  • Clear vision. Be sure you can see what you are shoveling/snowblowing. Do not let a hat or scarf block your vision. Watch for ice patches and uneven surfaces.

Tips for Snow Shoveling

  • Warm-up your muscles. Shoveling can be a vigorous activity. Before you begin this physical workout, warm-up your muscles for 10 minutes with light exercise.
  • Pace yourself. Snow shoveling and snow blowing are aerobic activities. Take frequent breaks and prevent dehydration by drinking plenty of fluids. If you experience chest pain, shortness of breath, or other signs of a heart attack, stop the activity and seek emergency care.
  • Proper equipment. Use a shovel that is comfortable for your height and strength. Do not use a shovel that is too heavy or too long for you. Space your hands on the tool grip to increase your leverage.
  • Proper lifting. Try to push the snow instead of lifting it. If you must lift, do it properly. Squat with your legs apart, knees bent, and back straight. Lift with your legs. Do not bend at the waist. Scoop small amounts of snow into the shovel and walk to where you want to dump it. Holding a shovelful of snow with your arms outstretched puts too much weight on your spine. Never remove deep snow all at once. Do it in pieces.
  • Safe technique. Do not throw the snow over your shoulder or to the side. This requires a twisting motion that stresses your back.

Tips for Snowblowing

  • Never stick your hands in the snowblower! If snow jams the snowblower, stop the engine and wait more than 5 seconds. Use a solid object to clear wet snow or debris from the chute. Beware of the recoil of the motor and blades after the machine has been turned off.
  • Proper supervision. Do not leave the snow blower unattended when it is running. Shut off the engine if you must walk away from the machine.
  • Safe fueling. Add fuel before starting the snow blower. Never add fuel when the engine is running or hot. Do not operate the machine in an enclosed area.
  • Avoid the engine. Stay away from the engine. It can become very hot and burn unprotected flesh.
  • Watch the snowblower cord. If you are operating an electric snow blower, be aware of where the power cord is at all times.
  • No tampering. Do not remove safety devices, shields, or guards on switches, and keep hands and feet away from moving parts.
  • Watch for motor recoil. Beware of the brief recoil of motor and blades that occurs after the machine has been turned off.
  • Keep children away. Never let children operate snowblowers. Keep children 15 years of age and younger away when snowblowers are in use.
  • Understand your machine. Read the instruction manual prior to using a snowblower. Be familiar with the specific safety hazards and unfamiliar features. Do not attempt to repair or maintain the snowblower without reading the instruction manual.

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS 2009 data and estimates) based on injuries treated in hospital emergency rooms

Article from: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00060

 

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SNOWMOBILE REGISTRATION IN WISCONSIN

Did you know you need to register your snowmobile before you drive it?  All snowmobiles operated in Wisconsin must be registered.  The following information and more may be obtained from the DNR website (http://dnr.wi.gov/permits/registrationandtitling.html)

Registration information

Snowmobile registration is required for operation of any snowmobile within the state - unless the operation is exempt from registration - and the registration decals must be properly displayed. Note: Proof of sales tax payment is required for all sales transactions. Sales tax paid to another state on the snowmobile may be claimed as a credit to reduce the tax payable.

Definition of snowmobile

  • In Wisconsin, a snowmobile is an engine-driven vehicle that is manufactured solely for snowmobiling that has an endless belt tread and sled-type runners, or skis, to be used in contact with snow. All snowmobiles must be 48 inches wide or less. The definition includes a child-sized snowmobile - see exceptions below for additional information.
    • A child's snowmobile is a snowmobile that is driven by a four horsepower (approximately 120 cubic centimeters in size) or less engine.
    • If operating a child's snowmobile on public areas - A child's snowmobile needs to be registered. This also includes frozen waters. Note: Please refer to the Wisconsin Snowmobile Laws pamphlet PUBL-LE-201 for child's snowmobile and age-riding restrictions.)
    • If operating a child's snowmobile in sanctioned races, derbies, competitions or exhibitions - Under these circumstances, registration is not required.
    • If operating a child's snowmobile on private property registration is not required, so long as the snowmobile is operated only on private property and is not operated on any part of a public trail.
  • A vehicle that has inflatable tires is not considered a snowmobile even if skis are attached. An ATV or similar machine that is converted with an aftermarket kit, complete with skis and a track cannot be registered as a snowmobile and cannot be driven on snowmobile trails.

Public use registration

All snowmobiles operated in Wisconsin must be registered. Public use registration allows you to operate your snowmobile on any area open to public riding and on private property with the appropriate permission.

Private use registration

Private use registration is for a snowmobile used exclusively on private property - i.e. use of a snowmobile is by the owner of the snowmobile, or a member of his/her immediate family, and on land owned or leased by the snowmobile owner or a member of his/her immediate family).

A snowmobile private use registration certificate is valid from the date of issuance until ownership of the snowmobile is transferred.

Nonresident snowmobile registration

A snowmobile operated on a public trail or corridor needs to display valid Wisconsin Public Use snowmobile registration or needs to display a valid Nonresident Snowmobile Trail Pass and valid nonresident registration. Nonresident customers choosing to register their snowmobile in Wisconsin will be liable to the Department of Revenue for sales tax on the purchase of the machine.

Note: A "corridor" includes a marked area across frozen waterways or area across frozen waterways as indicated on a county snowmobile trail map. It does not include routes.

A snowmobile operated on private property or frozen waterways outside a corridor needs to display valid Wisconsin snowmobile registration or needs to display valid registration from another state.

Visit sales locations to find an agent near you to purchase a Nonresident Snowmobile Trail Pass.

 

article by: WI DNR

http://dnr.wi.gov/permits/registrationandtitling.html

 

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SNOWMOBILE LAWS/RULES IN WISCONSIN

STATE LAWS AND RULES

All states have laws and rules regarding the operation of snowmobiles. It is best to know these laws if you are traveling out of your home state.  The following are state laws for our state, Wisconsin.

Wisconsin

The $18.00 annual non-resident snowmobile trail use pass is valid from July 1st through June 30th.

A snowmobile trail pass is required to operate a snowmobile not currently registered in Wisconsin on a snowmobile trail. The snowmobile must be currently registered with another jurisdiction. These passes can be purchased in Wisconsin or online at http://www.wildlifelicense.com/wi/.

No person under the age of 12 years may operate a snowmobile unless the person is accompanied on the same snowmobile, either by a parent or guardian or by a person over 18 years of age. Any person who is born on or after 1/1/85 and who has reached the age of 12, must have completed and received a snowmobile safety certificate in order to operate a snowmobile in Wisconsin. The certificate must be carried while operating the snowmobile. Other states and provinces that issue a snowmobile safety certificate to snowmobilers will be honored in Wisconsin.

Article from: http://snowmobilers.org/facts_statelaws.html
Wisconsin DNR: http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/snowmobile/

 

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TIPS FOR WEATHERING WINTER

 

  • Consider using non-toxic de-icing substances such as clean clay cat litter, sand, or fireplace/stove ash to prevent hazardous waste from chemicals. Chemical de-icers can be hazardous to your pets, your trees and shrubs, and the environment.
  • Winterize your vehicle by checking your air filter and fluid levels, checking tires for tread wear and proper inflation, and checking the condition of your windshield wipers. Ensuring your vehicle is ready for weather changes will keep you safe on the road.
  • If you have a wood-burning fireplace, save your ashes in a tin instead of throwing them away. Cold wood ashes can be mixed in your compost heap to create a valuable soil amendment that provides nutrients to your garden.
  • Winter storms often cause power outages. Prevent waste by keeping rechargeable batteries rather than disposable ones stored throughout your house with your flashlights. If you do use disposable batteries, prevent hazardous waste by buying batteries with low mercury content.
  • Recycle old newspapers by making rolled paper logs for your fireplace. Roll newspaper sheets around a broom stick until your log is the desired size; then soak your log thoroughly in water. Dry the log overnight and use like ordinary wood. Always follow proper safety precautions when burning anything around your home.

 

 

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TIPS TO WEATHER WINTER

  • Consider using non-toxic de-icing substances such as clean clay cat litter, sand, or fireplace/stove ash to prevent hazardous waste from chemicals. Chemical de-icers can be hazardous to your pets, your trees and shrubs, and the environment.
  • Winterize your vehicle by checking your air filter and fluid levels, checking tires for tread wear and proper inflation, and checking the condition of your windshield wipers. Ensuring your vehicle is ready for weather changes will keep you safe on the road.
  • If you have a wood-burning fireplace, save your ashes in a tin instead of throwing them away. Cold wood ashes can be mixed in your compost heap to create a valuable soil amendment that provides nutrients to your garden.
  • Winter storms often cause power outages. Prevent waste by keeping rechargeable batteries rather than disposable ones stored throughout your house with your flashlights. If you do use disposable batteries, prevent hazardous waste by buying batteries with low mercury content.
  • Recycle old newspapers by making rolled paper logs for your fireplace. Roll newspaper sheets around a broom stick until your log is the desired size; then soak your log thoroughly in water. Dry the log overnight and use like ordinary wood. Always follow proper safety precautions when burning anything around your home.

Article from:
http://www.epa.gov/epahome/hi-winter.htm#more

 

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WI SNOWMOBILE REGISTRATION IN WISCONSIN

Did you know you need to register your snowmobile before you drive it?  All snowmobiles operated in Wisconsin must be registered.  The following information and more may be obtained from the DNR website (http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/snowmobile/)

Registration

Residents—As a resident of Wisconsin, you have two main options of registering your snowmobile.

  • Public registration—Allows you to operate your snowmobile on any area open to public riding and on private property with the appropriate permission. Public registrations are valid for 2 years, which begins July 1 and expires June 30 two years later. The proof of registration must be carried with you while riding and must be presented to an enforcement officer when requested. Fee—$30.
  • Private registration—Allows a private property owner to register a snowmobile for his/her use or an immediate family member’s use. However, the snowmobile can only be used on the owner’s/immediate family member’s private property or lands leased by the owner/immediate family member. The proof of egistration must be carried with you while riding and must be presented to an enforcement officer when requested.  Fee—$0.

Display

Unless there is an exception, your snowmobile must display current registration decals, which must be prominently visible on both sides of the cowling.

Nonresidents—As a nonresident, you may operate your snowmobile in Wisconsin with your state’s current registration as long as the decal or proof of registration is prominently displayed and the snowmobile and the machine has not been in Wisconsin for more than 15 consecutive days. The proof of registration from your home state must be carried with you while riding and must be presented to an enforcement officer when requested. However, you should be aware that an out of state registered snowmobile that is in Wisconsin for longer than 15 days must be registered in Wisconsin.

Trail Pass

In addition, an out of state registered snowmobile must display a Wisconsin Nonresident Snowmobile Trail Pass anytime it is ridden on the trails. Nonresident Snowmobile Trail Passes can be purchased at any DNR office or license vendor, or on-line at www.dnr.wi.gov. The Nonresident Snowmobile Trail Pass is valid for one year and must be displayed directly on the front of the snowmobile windshield. Once attached, it cannot be transferred to any other snowmobile. Fee—$35.

 

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WI - SNOWMOBILE RULES IN WISCONSIN

All states have laws and rules regarding the operation of snowmobiles. It is best to know these laws if you are traveling out of your home state.  The following are state laws for our state, Wisconsin.

Wisconsin

The $18.00 annual non-resident snowmobile trail use pass is valid from July 1st through June 30th.

A snowmobile trail pass is required to operate a snowmobile not currently registered in Wisconsin on a snowmobile trail. The snowmobile must be currently registered with another jurisdiction. These passes can be purchased in Wisconsin or online at http://www.wildlifelicense.com/wi/.

No person under the age of 12 years may operate a snowmobile unless the person is accompanied on the same snowmobile, either by a parent or guardian or by a person over 18 years of age. Any person who is born on or after 1/1/85 and who has reached the age of 12, must have completed and received a snowmobile safety certificate in order to operate a snowmobile in Wisconsin. The certificate must be carried while operating the snowmobile. Other states and provinces that issue a snowmobile safety certificate to snowmobilers will be honored in Wisconsin.

Article from: http://snowmobilers.org/facts_statelaws.html
Wisconsin DNR: http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/snowmobile/

 

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WISCONSIN WINTER WEATHER TIPS

  • The coldest temperature in the winter of 2010-11 was -37° Fahrenheit (F) at Ladysmith 3SW (Rusk Co.) on January 22, 2011.
  • The Hurley, WI–Ironwood, MI, area in Iron County had the most snow of 167 inches in the winter of 2010-11, while Waunakee in Dane County had the least with only 37.2 inches. Most of the northern two-thirds of the state had 60 to 95 inches, while the southern third had 40 to 60 inches. The 92.6" in Green Bay during the '10-'11 winter was the highest amount in modern-day history. Only the winters of 1889-90 and 1887-88 had more snow.
  • Wisconsin's all-time, lowest temperature is -55°F on February 2 & 4, 1996, near Couderay (Sawyer Co.). Readings of -30°F or colder have been recorded in every month from November through April. Of course, brief readings in the 50's, 60's and 70's are possible during winter as well!
  • Average annual snowfall ranges from 35 to 40 inches near the Illinois border to 135 to 165 inches in the Iron County snow-belt from Gurney to Hurley.

Official snowfall records

  • Greatest daily total – 26.0 inches of snow, at Neillsville on Dec. 27, 1904, and Pell Lake on Feb. 2, 2011.
  • Greatest single storm total - Superior, 31.0 inches over Oct. 31-Nov. 2, 1991.
  • Greatest monthly total - Hurley, 103.5 inches in Jan. 1997.
  • Greatest seasonal total - Hurley, 301.8 inches in winter of 1996-97.
  • Deepest snow on ground (excluding drifts) - Hurley, 60.0 inches on Jan. 30, 1996.

Keep Warm and Safe

Frostbite is damage to body tissue caused by extreme cold. A wind chill around –20°F could cause frostbite in just 15 minutes or less. Frostbite causes a loss of feeling and a white or pale appearance in extremities such as fingers, toes, ear tips or the tip of the nose. If symptoms are detected, seek medical care immediately!

Hypothermia is a condition that develops when the body temperature drops below 95°F. It is very deadly. Warning signs include uncontrollable shivering, disorientation, slurred speech and drowsiness. Seek medical care immediately!

Overexertion is dangerous. Cold weather puts an added strain on the heart. Unaccustomed exercise such as shoveling snow or pushing a car can bring on a heart attack or make an existing medical condition worse.

Pets also need extra care when the temperatures fall. They should be brought inside when the temperature reaches 30°F with wind chill. Dogs and cats can get frost bitten ears, nose and feet if left outside during bitter cold weather. Chemicals used to melt snow and ice can also irritate pets' paws - be sure to keep anti-freeze, salt and other poisons away from pets.

Be Prepared - Some of the dangers associated with winter storms include loss of heat, power and telephone service and a shortage of supplies. To help protect your family, now is the time to put together a disaster supply kit. Here are some items to include:

  • Flashlights and extra batteries
  • Battery-powered NOAA Weather Radio and a commercial radio
  • Bottled water and non-perishable food that requires no cooking
  • First-aid supplies
  • Fire extinguisher, smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector
  • If appropriate, extra medications and baby items
  • If you have an emergency heating source such as a fireplace or space heater, make sure you have proper ventilation
  • Make sure pets have shelter and plenty of food and water

For additional information, contact your county emergency management office, the National Weather Service or ReadyWisconsin. Tips on winter safety, developing your own personal preparedness plan and building an emergency kit can also be found at the following website: http://www.weather.gov

 Article from: http://ready.wi.gov/winter/winter_weather_facts.asp

 


 

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Information and recommendations are compiled from sources believed to be reliable. The Sheriff’s Office  makes no guarantee as to and assumes no responsibility for the correctness, sufficiency or completeness of such information or recommendations. Other or additional safety measures may be required under particular circumstances.

Last Revised: 3/2014