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Summer Crime Prevention

The school year is almost over, which means that summer vacation is just a few weeks away. For teens, summertime is often split between time home alone, at a job, out with friends, or traveling. It’s important for teens to know that even though their summer schedules may allow for more freedom than their academic schedules, they still need to follow rules and understand that negative choices will continue to bring negative consequences. Share these tips with teens to help them stay safe during their summertime ventures.
Staying safe when home alone

  • Remember not to do anything while home alone that you aren’t allowed to do when your parents are there.
  • If you use the Internet, remember to engage in friendly and legal behavior. Be sure not to cyberbully or download pirated music/videos/software. Do not give any personal information (such as your address or phone number) to anyone you meet online. Never let people you meet online know that you are home alone.
  • Don’t let anyone in your home without a parent’s permission. If something goes wrong while you’re home alone, call a trusted adult or law enforcement officer to help you.

Staying safe at work

  • Be sure not to work alone, especially after hours. Create a buddy system for walking to parking lots or public transportation.
  • Keep your purse, wallet, keys, or other valuables with you at all times or locked in a closet, drawer, or locker. Mark other personal items with your name or initials.
  • Know the exit routes and evacuation plans for your building.

Staying safe with friends

  • Using alcohol or drugs is illegal and dangerous no matter where you are or who you are with. Using tobacco is dangerous, too. Don’t allow yourself to give in to peer pressure or make poor choices.
  • Pay attention to the road when driving with friends. Car accidents are one of the leading causes of death for teens.
  • Before you leave your house, tell your parent or caregiver where you are going, who you are going to be with, and when you’ll return.

Staying safe when traveling

  • Carry traveler’s checks instead of cash, and record information (serial numbers and item name) of any valuables you take on your vacation (such as cameras or mp3 players). Take a copy of the information with you, and leave one with a family member or trusted adult.
  • Learn about your vacation destination before you arrive; know what sites you want to visit and how to get there using a safe, well-traveled route.
  • Be sure to lock your room at your lodging place, and insist that everyone carry his or her key when outside the room. Remember not to give out your room number or invite strangers into your room.

 


Safety Tips for Travelers

When you're traveling for business or pleasure, make sure you remember these safety tips provided by the American Hotel and Motel Association:

  • Don't answer the door in a hotel or motel room without first verifying the identity of the person at the door. If the person claims to be an employee, call the front desk and ask if someone from their staff is supposed to have access to your room and for what purpose.
  • When returning to your hotel or motel late in the evening, use the main entrance of the hotel. Be observant and look around before entering parking lots.
  • Close the door securely whenever you are in your room and use all of the locking devices provided.
  • Don't needlessly display guest room keys in public or carelessly leave them on restaurant tables, at the swimming pool, or other places where they can be easily stolen.
  • Do not draw attention to yourself by displaying large amounts of cash or expensive jewelry.
  • Don't invite strangers to your room.
  • Place all valuables in the hotel or motel's safe deposit box.
  • Do not leave valuables in your vehicle.
  • Check to see that any sliding glass doors or windows and any connecting room doors are locked.
  • If you see any suspicious activity, please report your observations to the management.
  • Discretely carry a map and be familiar with the area you are visiting. Plan trips in advance.
  • Don't leave purses or pocketbooks on the back of a chair when dining out; keep them in your lap and insight.
  • Keep your wallet in the front pocket of pants or a jacket pocket, not in the rear pocket.

 

 

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Campfire Safety

All it takes is one spark for things to go wrong. A carelessly abandoned campfire or a campfire built without safe clearance can turn a small fire into a dangerous and fast-moving blaze. Be sure to build your campfire in a way that does not endanger anyone or the surrounding forest. Enjoy a safe campfire by following these campfire safety tips:

  • Check with local authorities on open-air burning restrictions and follow local burning regulations. Keep up-to-date on fire bans in the area.
  • Never build a campfire on a windy day. Sparks or embers from the fire could travel quite a distance setting an unintentional fire.
  • Watch the wind direction to ensure sparks aren't getting on flammable materials. Put the fire out if wind changes begin to cause concern.
  • Build campfires where they will not spread; well away from tents, trailers, dry grass, leaves, overhanging tree branches or any other combustible.
  • Build campfires in fire pits provided or on bare rock or sand, if no fire pit is provided.
  • Maintain a 2 to 3.5 metre (6 – 10 foot) clearance around your campfire.
  • Build a campfire surround with rocks to contain your campfire. Be aware that rocks obtained from the river may explode due to moisture in the rock becoming superheated by the campfire.
  • Use crumpled paper and/or kindling to start a fire rather than using flammable liquids.
  • Never use gasoline as an aid to starting a campfire. If a fire starter is required, use only proper lighting fluid and use the lighting fluid sparingly. NEVER PUT IT ON AN OPEN FLAME since the fire can ignite the stream of lighting fluid and the flame will travel up the stream igniting the container in your hand and causing serious injury. Once the lighting fluid has been applied to the firewood, allow a few minutes for the explosive vapours to disperse before lighting. Remove the lighting fluid container a safe distance away before lighting the campfire.
  • Secure all lighters and matches and keep them out of children’s reach.
  • Keep campfires to a small, manageable size no more than 1 metre (3 feet) high by 1 metre (3 feet) in diameter and don't let it get out of hand.
  • Don't burn garbage in your campfire. The smell is unpleasant for you and your neighbours, and may attract animals to your campsite.
  • Keep all combustible materials, including flammable liquids, propane cylinders, lighting fluid, etc. away from the campfire.
  • Stack extra wood upwind and away from the campfire so that sparks from the campfire cannot ignite your woodpile. Have sufficient wood on hand to eliminate the need to leave your campsite to restock.
  • Never leave campfires unattended. Ensure that a responsible adult is monitoring the campfire at all times. Supervise children around campfires at all times and never allow horseplay near or involving the campfire, such as jumping over a campfire. Do not allow children to run around near a campfire.
  • Closely supervise children while roasting treats over a campfire. A flaming marshmallow can easily ignite a child’s clothing. A heated metal skewer can be a burn hazard, as well as a puncture hazard.
  • Loose clothing can easily catch fire. Never reach into a campfire to rearrange pieces of wood.
  • Teach children how to STOP, DROP and ROLL should their clothing catch on fire. Teach children to cool a burn with cool running water for 3 – 5 minutes.
  • Keep plenty of water and a shovel around to douse the fire when you're done. Use caution when applying water to the campfire. Once the water has been applied, stir the dampened coals and douse it again with water. As an added precaution, shovel sand or dirt to cover the dampened coals to smother any remaining embers.
  • As little as 1 second contact with a 70°C (158°F) campfire can cause 3rd degree, full thickness burns.
  • The average campfire can get as hot as 500°C (932°F) in as little as 3 hrs.
  • The majority of children are burned the morning after a fire from coming into contact with hot ashes or embers.
  • A campfire left to burn itself out or put out with sand only was still 100°C (212°F) eight hours later. The buried coals and embers retain their heat underground like an oven. There is also a risk that the fire may spontaneously re-ignite. A child may mistake the pile of sand or dirt as a sand castle and attempt to play in it. The temperature, less than 10 cm (4”) below the surface of the sand or dirt can be as high as 300 °C (572°F).
  • A campfire put out with water is reduced to 50°C (122°F) within 10 minutes of applying the water and reduced to 10°C (50°F) after 8 hrs. The safest way to extinguish a campfire is with water.

 

 

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